Category Archives: CB65 Cannabinoid Receptor

Study: Cannabis Agonists Produce Anti-Cancer Effects In Human Liver Cancer Cells

TEHRAN, IRAN – The administration of synthetic cannabinoid agonists reduce cell viability in human hepacarcinoma cells and may be a potential option for the treatment of liver cancer, according to preclinical data published online in the journal Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

Investigators from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology assessed the anti-cancer properties of two synthetic cannabinoids, CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist) and ACEA (CB1 receptor agonist) in human hepacarcinoma cells.

Authors reported that the administration of cannabinoids reduced malignant cell viability and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner. “These data suggest ACEA and CB65 as an option for novel treatment of hepatocellular cancer,” they concluded.

Previous studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids inhibit tumor cell growth and selectively induced apoptosis by different cell signaling pathways in various types of malignant cells, including gliomas (brain cancers) and lymphomas, prostate, breast, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer cells.

Anti-Cancer Effects In Human Liver Cancer Cells Produced By Cannabis Agonists

According to preclinical data published online in the journal Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods, the administration of synthetic cannabinoid agonists minimizes cell viability in human hepacarcinoma cells and could be a potential option for treating liver cancer.

The anti-cancer properties of two synthetic cannabinoids, CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist) and ACEA (CB1 receptor agonist) in human hepacarcinoma cells were assessed by investigators from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology.

It was reported by the authors that the cannabinoid administration minimized malignant cell viability and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner. “These data suggest ACEA and CB65 as an option for novel treatment of hepatocellular cancer,” they concluded.

Studies in the past have demonstrated that tumor cell growth is inhibited by cannabinoids that also inhibit selectively induced apoptosis by different cell signaling pathways in various types of malignant cells, including gliomas (brain cancers) and lymphomas, prostate, breast, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer cells.

The study “Evaluation of Anti-invasion Effect of Cannabinoids on Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells,” is available in Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

Study: Cannabis Agonists Produce Anti-Cancer Effects In Human Liver Cancer Cells.

Tehran, Iran: The administration of synthetic cannabinoid agonists reduce cell viability in human hepacarcinoma cells and may be a potential option for the treatment of liver cancer, according to preclinical data published online in the journal Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

Investigators from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology assessed the anti-cancer properties of two synthetic cannabinoids, CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist) and ACEA (CB1 receptor agonist) in human hepacarcinoma cells.

Authors reported that the administration of cannabinoids reduced malignant cell viability and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner. “These data suggest ACEA and CB65 as an option for novel treatment of hepatocellular cancer,” they concluded.

Previous studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids inhibit tumor cell growth and selectively induced apoptosis by different cell signaling pathways in various types of malignant cells, including gliomas (brain cancers) and lymphomas, prostate, breast, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer cells.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Evaluation of Anti-invasion Effect of Cannabinoids on Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells,” is available in Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

Granny Storm Crow’s Medical Marijuana Reference List has been updated! 2013

Granny Storm’s updated list is available and everyone should have it! This list has over 800 pages of research links. She will send a free PDF copy to anyone who sends her an email at stormcrow@greenpassion.org . I added Granny’s index to the bottom of this post to entice you!

From Granny’s list: Women need to know that CBD from cannabis can slow the progress of aggressive breast cancers. Everyone should be aware that when it comes to preventing Alzheimer’s, THC greatly outperforms Aricept. And in the 1950s, it was discovered that a simple cannabis extract kills 100% of drug-resistant Staph aureus germs on contact. Drug-resistant Staph aureus is now called MRSA, the flesh-eating bacteria.

Study: Cannabis Agonists Produce Anti-Cancer Effects In Human Liver Cancer Cells

Tehran, Iran: The administration of synthetic cannabinoid agonists reduce cell viability in human hepacarcinoma cells and may be a potential option for the treatment of liver cancer, according to preclinical data published online in the journal Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

Investigators from the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology assessed the anti-cancer properties of two synthetic cannabinoids, CB65 (CB2 receptor agonist) and ACEA (CB1 receptor agonist) in human hepacarcinoma cells.

Authors reported that the administration of cannabinoids reduced malignant cell viability and cell invasion in a dose-dependent manner. “These data suggest ACEA and CB65 as an option for novel treatment of hepatocellular cancer,” they concluded.

Previous studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids inhibit tumor cell growth and selectively induced apoptosis by different cell signaling pathways in various types of malignant cells, including gliomas (brain cancers) and lymphomas, prostate, breast, lung, skin, and pancreatic cancer cells.

For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Evaluation of Anti-invasion Effect of Cannabinoids on Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells,” is available in Toxicology Mechanisms and Methods.

The Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 Is Essential for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Survival and Differentiation: Implications for Bone Health

Discipline of Physiology, School of Medicine, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
2School of Engineering, Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland

Received 30 November 2012; Revised 30 May 2013; Accepted 4 June 2013

Academic Editor: Pranela Rameshwar

Copyright © 2013 Aoife Gowran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Significant loss of bone due to trauma, underlying metabolic disease, or lack of repair due to old age surpasses the body’s endogenous bone repair mechanisms. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which may represent an ideal cell type for use in cell-based tissue engineered bone regeneration strategies. The body’s endocannabinoid system has been identified as a central regulator of bone metabolism. The aim of the study was to elucidate the role of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 in the differentiation and survival of MSCs. We show that the cannabinoid receptor type 1 has a prosurvival function during acute cell stress. Additionally, we show that the phytocannabinoid, -Tetrahydrocannabinol, has a negative impact on MSC survival and osteogenesis. Overall, these results show the potential for the modulation of the cannabinoid system in cell-based tissue engineered bone regeneration strategies whilst highlighting cannabis use as a potential cause for concern in the management of orthopaedic patients.

Cannabinoid Receptors and Pain Relief with Acupuncture

Acupuncture has long been shown to relieve pain, but medical science lacked a mechanism to explain how it works. Now research out of Shanghai China reported in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine finds that the cannabinoid system provides an answer.

The new research is entitled Electroacupuncture inhibition of hyperalgesia in rats with adjuvant arthritis: involvement of cannabinoid receptor 1 and dopamine receptor subtypes in striatum. The cannabinoid system is the regulatory system discovered and revealed over the past 25 years to play major roles in homeostasis and pain relief. The cannabinoid receptor 1 mentioned is usually abbreviated CB1, and is the main receptor activated by cannabis (marijuana) and also by natural endocannabinoids produced by our bodies.

Based on their knowledge that dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in electroacupuncture analgesia, they conjectured that the ” CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum.” They found at the sites of two pain relieving acupuncture points “that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher.” They conclude, “these results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression.” Activating these CB1 receptors turned on the D1/D2 receptor genes.

Activation Of Cannabinoid Receptors May Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

A new study published by the journal Neurobiology of Aging has found promising evidence to suggest that Alzheimer’s disease is significantly worsened by a deficiency in the body’s cannabinoid receptors, indicating that the disease could be treated with cannabis, which naturally activates these receptors.

For the study, researchers implanted mice with Alzheimer’s disease, and examined a control group compared to a group which was deficient in cannabinoid receptors. Researchers found that the mice which were deficient in a particular cannabinoid receptor “showed impaired learning and memory deficits” compared to the control group.

According to the study’s abstract, “The surviving mice showed a reduced amount of APP and its fragments suggesting a regulatory influence of CB1 on APP processing, which was confirmed by modulating CB1 expression in vitro”.

Researchers conclude that these “findings indicate that CB1 deficiency can worsen AD-related cognitive deficits and support a potential role of CB1 as a pharmacologic target.”

These findings help to confirm a study published recently in the journal Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, which found that cannabis can slow, and potentially even cure Alzheimer’s disease.

The Membrane Proximal Region of the Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 N-Terminus Can Allosterically Modulate Ligand Affinity.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oregon Health and Science University , Portland, Oregon 97239-3098, United States.

Abstract
The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Can Combat Skin Cancer, According To New Study

ITALY: A new study published by the National Institute of Health has found that activation of the body’s cannabinoid receptors can combat skin cancer.

Activation of the body’s cannabinoid receptors helps with a number of diseases and ailments, including skin cancer according to this new study.

According to researchers at the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Pisa in Italy; “Cannabinoids are implicated in the control of cell proliferation, but little is known about the role of the endocannabinoid system in human malignant melanoma [the deadliest form of skin cancer]. This study was aimed at characterizing the in vitro antitumor activity of anandamide [a naturally occurring cannabinoid] in A375 melanoma cells.”

The study concludes that; “Overall, these findings demonstrate that AEA [anadamide] induces cytotoxicity against human melanoma cells in the micromolar range of concentrations through a complex mechanism, which involves COX-2 and LOX-derived product synthesis and CB1 activation”. This demonstrates that activation of the body’s cannabinoid receptors – which cannabis does naturally – has strong anticancer capabilities.

A study released earlier this year found similar results; using cannabinoids on mice, researchers were able to reduce skin cancer by 90% in just 20 weeks.

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